Topic Archives: Projects

Support Tally Ho

Feb 9, 2019, 7:06 PM
In this episode, while the team keeps on building new frames, Leo makes the templates for the Stern part of the Centerline, from the lofting floor. The ShipSaw gets some love and affection, and the framing of the centre-section of the boat is completed! Kirt and Leo talk about his really exciting idea about speeding up the next phase of the project, and despite a snowstorm, Leo make the first few cuts on the Sternpost timber with the Chainsaw Jig.
Jan 26, 2019, 10:36 PM
In this episode, after a little work on the frames, Cecca and Leo take a trip to Vancouver for leo's VISA interview at the US consulate. When they get back to the USA Cecca has to head back home to the UK, but we start building a new team with three guys who arrive to help out – including one who has been here already. We get the huge Purpleheart timbers for the rest of the centerline delivered by truck, and we discover a very old bullet embedded deep in one of the pieces of Live Oak framing stock. At the end of this video we have replaced almost every frame in the centre-section of Tally Ho!
Jan 6, 2019, 4:30 PM
In this episode, Leo starts by installing and running a new helical cutter-head in the planer thicknesser, before making a pair of oak frames with the help of some volunteers, and notching those intermediate frames into the keel timber. Then he takes a trip to Port Townsend, where he visits the Western Flyer, a historic fishing boat which once took John Steinbeck and Ed Ricketts around the Gulf of California. Finally he visits Edensaw, to buy the huge purpleheart timbers which will make up the remaining pieces of Tally Ho’s new centerline!
Dec 24, 2018, 8:27 AM
In this episode, Leo and friends continue replacing frames, starting now on the intermediate frames in-between the station frames. Washington is hit by severe wind and power cuts – will the boat-shed survive?! Brad is still helping out, and we are joined by a young guy from Illinois who is keen to help out and learn a little about boatbuilding. In other news, we get a Christmas Tree in the loft, and make some improvements to our bunk-room.
Dec 9, 2018, 1:12 PM
Well, I’ve done something very silly and cut the end of my finger. Why would I do that, you may ask?! Well, it was all going a little too well, so I thought it was time to add a little drama to this project! In other news, making and installing the new frames has been progressing pretty well, and we have now replaced every station-frame in the centre section of the boat! We also finished the “roller-furling” roof on the new covered area beside the boat. Eventually, Ben and Steve had to leave, but I’m now getting some more help from Brad, who drove up from Oregon. Feel free to guess how I injured my finger, but it wasn’t on the table-saw or the ship-saw! (and yes, I am fully capitalizing on this injury to try and get more YouTube views)
Nov 27, 2018, 6:03 PM
Leo thought it was about time you guys got to know him a little better. This video – edited and presented by Doug at SV Seeker – is a series of questions and answers about Leo's background, his work, and the Tally Ho project. Leo talks about his motivation for taking on a project like this, and the various challenges that present themselves along the way. Please note that this was filmed a few months ago, so there are a couple of details that are out of date. Thanks to Doug for making this happen.
Nov 11, 2018, 11:25 PM
In this episode Leo welcomes back Francesca to the workshop and introduce a couple of volunteers who are going to stay here for a while to learn some boatbuilding and help out with the project. But before they arrive, he has to replace the huge roof of the shed over the boat, and make some improvements to the workshop kitchen, with a bit of furniture joinery. Then he shows the guys how to fit a pair of new frames, and we also cut out all the pieces for the next set on the shipsaw. Now we have four pairs of new double-sawn frames in the boat, and another pair ready to assemble.
Oct 29, 2018, 3:41 PM
In this episode Leo returns to Washington State USA, and gets back to work on Tally Ho! First he gives a brief tour of the project, and a little overview of the work done up until now. He gets the ship-saw set up again, and then get on with cutting a few more futtocks and assembling another couple of frames. He also talks about his plans and ideas for the future of the project, and how he's going to try and speed things up!
Oct 24, 2018, 1:07 PM
In this episode Leo visits two incredible projects that are both happening in Cornwall UK. They are both giving new life to traditional wooden fishing boats, but they are doing so in very different ways! Charlotte and Jess have rebuilt and converted their wooden fishing boat into a motor launch with a banquet table, and have started a business taking people out around the Cornish coastline for hand-cooked meals on board. Steve is maintaining and repairing his 110 year-old Danish Fishing Trawler, which has begun to work once more – but this time she is fishing for garbage! Steve has been clearing up rubbish and trash from the Cornish coastline for years, but now plans to use the huge fishing schooner to scale up the operation and clean less accessible areas, raising awareness of the issues of marine plastic waste at the same time.
Oct 8, 2018, 9:13 PM
Leo is away from Tally Ho at the moment, visiting friends and family. As usual in these times, he's chatting with boatbuilders for interest, information and learning. In this episode Leo visits Chris Rees, a very experienced boatbuilder who was behind various impressive projects including the enormous 3-masted lugger Greyhound and the replica fishing lugger Spirit of Mystery (which was sailed from the UK to Australia by Pete Goss as a tribute to the fishermen who undertook the same trip in the 1850s) Chris shows Leo around the boat that he is currently working on – a 1905 Pilot Cutter named Letty – and also tells Leo a little about how he became a boatbuilder. Finally they look at another boat that Chris is hoping to bring back to life – a historic local ferry, which up until recently was apparently the longest continuously running ferry in the country. Originally a Steam powered vessel, it was later modified with a diesel engine, but Chris is hoping to equip it with an Electric motor for the next period of service.