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Sep 19, 2020, 6:05 PM
Having poured all the smaller bronze Floors, we have to build a bigger flask in order to cast the largest ones. Packing these big moulds isn’t without it’s setbacks, and we experience the frustration of having the sand collapse onto the ground after a whole day of shovelling and ramming. Eventually we make a successful pour, and after this piece is ground and finished it is bolted into the boat alongside its siblings. Meanwhile, the last of the patterns are made - including all the Lodging Knees and Breast Hooks. The crew become obsessed with a small wooden puzzle that arrived mysteriously in the mail - all apart from Pancho, who is beyond the limitations of puny human diversion.
Sep 5, 2020, 6:52 PM
Cutting the Prop aperture and boring out the hole for the stern-tube are intimidating jobs - you only get one chance to get it right. But it’s easier to tackle these tasks before the planking goes on, and Leo's had the help of a shipbuilding engineer to work out the best shape and size for these alarming new holes. Also in this episode, Leo finally make the template for the final shape of the transom, and Pete fairs it into the rest of the hull very nicely - more-or-less completing the tedious but valuable fairing job. The shapes of the lower planks get lined out and marked on the frames in preparation for fastening the floors.
Aug 22, 2020, 7:29 PM
In this episode Leo starts thinking about the plank fastenings for Tally Ho. Using copper rivets is the strongest and most authentic choice, but they are not available to buy in the size I need. Just as I am trying to work out the smartest way to make the rivets, we receive a mysterious box in the mail, from a fan. Amazingly, someone has custom-fabricated a machine for making copper rivets out of round bar! We also work on making all the patterns for the hanging knees, which will be cast in Bronze at PT Foundry. Matt and David join the team, and get stuck into grinding bronze, and Rosie gets into her stride laminating the patterns. Backtrack is unamused by the baby chicks.
Aug 8, 2020, 10:28 PM
In this episode we calculate the locations and sizes of all the hull planks, based on the complex shape of the hull. I’ve never done this before, so we get some help from the Lead Shipwright on the Western Flyer Project (Shipwrights Co-Op, PT). I’m also very excited to welcome two new members to the team - Rosie, who is going to be in an apprentice-style role, and Charlie, who is going to be helping out with video production! We also continue working on the floors, fairing the frames, and making long battens for the lining-out. Meanwhile Backtrack finds a new favourite napping spot and Pancho steps up her dancing game.
Jul 25, 2020, 11:40 PM
In this episode we take a look at the names of the basic parts of a wooden boat. Hopefully this will help people who haven’t had much experience with traditionally built vessels to better understand what we are doing on Tally Ho! After that Leo starts working on the hanging and lodging knee patterns, creating a jig to taper stacks of plywood for the laminated arms. Pat’s wife Bonny helps us out with some grinding whilst Pat casts more floors at Port Townsend Foundry. Clark fits the floors into the boat and Pete continues fairing the frames for planking, only stopping occasionally to tell me exactly what he is doing…
Jul 12, 2020, 10:56 AM
In this episode Leo focuses on the final install of the transom, using a couple of old tricks to ensure that it stays watertight. The planks get bolted to the sternpost and eventually fully plugged and varnished. Pat keeps busy at the Port Townsend Foundry, casting more Floors in Bronze. Clark fits the Floors into the boat - grinding, sanding and polishing them to ridiculous perfection! Meanwhile, Pete works hard on fairing the Rabbet and beginning to fair the outside of the frames, while Pancho keeps an eye on him and busts out some funky moves for the camera!
Jun 27, 2020, 6:28 PM
In this extra-length episode, Pete and Clark show the process of making individual patterns for each of the floors, laminating thin strips of ply into the boat and then shaping and sculpting them into the shape that we need. Patrick returns to help get the boat ready for planking, and we take the patterns to Port Townsend Foundry, where we learn all about the exciting bronze casting process, pack some moulds, and pour the first two floors for Tally Ho. When the molten bronze has solidified and cooled, we can break them out, grind them down, and take them back to the boat to see if they fit! Meanwhile, Pancho keeps her beady eye on the hens, and Backtrack expands his repertoire of napping spots!
Jun 13, 2020, 6:26 PM
In this episode Leo works on repairing and reinstalling Tally Ho’s original transom timbers. Being Teak, they have escaped rot, but have a lot of damaged areas and holes that need to be filled with plugs and graving pieces. He also needs to add a couple of new planks, so he visits a friend with some Teak for sale, and has a look around his interesting workshop. The planks are joined together with vertical splines and fastened to the stern of the boat. An assortment of animals try to get in the way, as always.
Jun 1, 2020, 10:40 PM
This is the day - the big reveal! With the deck structure fastened permanently into the Beam Shelf, we can remove the temporary cross-palls and finally see Tally Ho’s internal space and the underside of the deck structure. But before we bolt them into place, we have to prepare the deck beams by sanding, chamfering and varnishing them. Luckily we have the help of a new volunteer - Clark. We also fasten the bilge stringer to the frames, and take care of the most satisfying job of all - trimming all the frame-heads with a chainsaw!
May 17, 2020, 9:43 AM
In this episode we face a major dilemma - having found that one of the White Oak logs had porous grain (bad news!) Leo has to make the painful decision of whether or not to replace 19 deck beams that we already made from it. Meanwhile, Tally Ho’s planking stock arrives and is stacked ready for planking. The frames get faired and the bilge stringers get made, scarphed, and finally bent into the hull of the boat. Finally all is well, and Patrick teaches us some useful boat terminology.